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NYC Grid is a photo blog dedicated to exploring New York block-by-block and corner-by-corner. Each post covers a new street or feature with a focus on the mundane and ephemeral.

  

Entries in Wall Street (10)

Wednesday
Jan012014

Before & After - Federal Hall

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after

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It's often mentioned that Federal Hall is where Washington was inaugurated as our first president. This is true, but – like most facts involving history – is somewhat misleading. The classical structure familiar to generations of New Yorkers was built over 40 years after Washington's death (1842). The original Federal Hall – the one that also acted as the nation's capital for a short period – was built in 1700 and had a balcony that was perfect for things like inaugurations. The current Hall's large steps which wrap around the statue of Washington are often mistaken as the site of the depicted historical event.

Sharing a similar history, Trinity Church (visible in the background) was built in 1846, but various buildings known as Trinity Church had been around since the late 1690's.

Photo source: Tom Riggle, Flickr

Wednesday
Sep182013

Before & After - Broad Street & The New York Stock Exchange

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after

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One of my favorite geographical fallacies is that of the New York Stock Exchange being on Wall Street. Sure, the building itself is right on the corner of Wall Street, but the main face and colonnade so often associated with the NYSE actually sits on Broad Street – a more impressive-looking street in my opinion, and one that often is misidentified as Wall. A more historic building, Federal Hall, sits on Wall Street proper and is visible from Broad. The steps of this building were the site of George Washington's first inauguration.


Photo source:  Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Detroit Publishing Company Collection.

Monday
Aug262013

Before & After - Broadway, The Canyon of Heroes

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Though Broadway enjoys many different nicknames as it meanders up Manhattan, the most famous might be "The Canyon of Heroes". Between Bowling Green and City Hall the street is both narrow and flanked by very tall, classic-looking office buildings. This combination creates one of the most famous stretches of road in American history. Serving as host to countless ticker-tape parades over the last hundred years, these few blocks typically just serve as a funnel for thousands of tourists who come to gawk at our big bronze bull.


Photo source:  Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.

Wednesday
Aug142013

Before & After - 23 Wall Street

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after

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If you're going to build something directly across from both the New York Stock Exchange and Federal Hall, you better make sure it can hold its own architecturally. At 100 years old this year, I don't think anyone would argue that 23 Wall St - The House of Morgan – is anything less than a staple of the Financial District. A bombing in 1920 left the limestone facade pockmarked from shrapnel. In recent years the classic building and its neighbor have been converted into a condo development.


Photo source:  Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division.

Friday
Aug132010

Stone St Between Broad St and Whitehall St

    

When I set out to walk down this block, I had blindly selected it based on the fact that I had heard people talking about its unique outdoor cafe seating and cobblestone surface. Imagine my disappointment when I realized I had picked the wrong segment of Stone Street (the part everyone talks about is two blocks away). But, I had made my choice and went ahead and took photos of this depressing block.

The block is fairly typical of this neighborhood – towering buildings with decaying bases and dirty sidewalks. The rare moment of sunlight trickling through is immediately curtailed by either construction canopies or rows of parked trucks. Both ends of this block are dead ends with huge buildings blocking thru-traffic. Walking down it you almost feel like you're on a movie set (you know, the type where you can't see infinitely down the street, usually due to the impracticability of building a ridiculously-long set?) that's easily escapable.


Friday
Mar262010

Ann St Between Nassau St and Park Row

I must admit, I didn't really know this street was even here. The whole maze that makes up this neighborhood makes it very easy to overlook entire areas. When you're standing on Park Row, this block seems to disappear into the background; and why wouldn't it? You have so many prominent landmarks surrounding you, what use is it to notice Ann Street? 

The block itself was a lot of fun to walk down. Full of incredibly narrow, yet tall buildings that cast uneven shadows on the ground. One third of the way down the street is Theater Alley, which Scouting NY had a great little write-up on recently.

Really, the key to this block is to keep your gaze skyward. Every rooftop and wall seems to have something unique to present. The street-level, by comparison, isn't all that much to look at.